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and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be declared in a
in a conflict zone, a war zone, in a country where the united states may be very unpopular, people will relate to you as a human being. there will be local cultures of hospitality that take over and effectively protect you. you rely on your fellow human beings to look after you. often, as a foreigner, i am better taken care of by people in many places than if the same people i and interacting with were dealing with locals. >> what was the reaction to you as an american? >> it was ok. people are eager to meet an american, even when they are not happy to meet an american. they are polite. there was an occasion where i went to afghanistan to sit with a man who had been a notorious -- he was accused of being an opium trafficker. there was little doubt. he did not want to talk or see me. but it is afghanistan. i am his guest. he has to offer mitme tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give mime tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than
his guest. he has to offer me tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give me tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than that. most people invite you home and have a lot want to say. it is as if in many cases people had been thinking about the united states a lot. probably a lot more than we think about other countries. even though i am not an employee of the government, i am not an ambassador, it is as if i am the ambassador. they want the united states to know something. what their lives are like. they may have a specific message about a specific american policy, but they are very courteous and often are really energizing to meet. >> you said earlier you are from indiana and you went in to kentucky to college. >> i heard about it through various ways. they are a university that was founded in the coal mining country in eastern kentucky. the daughters who were coal minors had gone there for generations. they wanted mor
talk this afternoon is, love and honor in 1812. patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i exhort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wrongs, that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress had voted in favor of declaring war not one single member of the federalist party had voted in support of the war. northeastern federalists took a very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 very quick
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
stoeld in the united states. he's a critic of the united states, more notably againstle elm peer yalists and some excuses from nationalizing the steel industry to the oil industry. and so a change here would mean a lot for the united states, in many different was. not just oil and energy companies but in our relations with south america in general. >> would election results come in a matter of hours or perhaps days after polls close? >> reporter: hopefully not days. they have a very organized election system here. the line-ups have been long, i can tell you that. by the same token they expect results in the wee hours. you know, perhaps six or seven hours from now we should know what's happening. there is some apprehension. this election could beery close. some people filtered out exit polls already, and they're vastly different. each side is saying they're going to win. listen to a young voter that i spoke to earlier today, and listen to what he told me when i asked him about voting. you don't want to say who you're voting for? >> yes, because the vote is secret. the important thing is t
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
muslims, not have them isolate the united states of america. i know i can do a better job in iraq. i have a plan to have a summit with all of the allies, something this president has not yet achieved, not yet been able to do to bring people to the table. we can do a better job of training the iraqi forces to defend themselves, and i know that we can do a better job of preparing for elections. all of these, and especially homeland security, which we'll talk about a little bit later. >> mr. president, you have a 90- second rebuttal. >> i, too, thank the university of miami, and say our prayers are with the good people of this state, who've suffered a lot. september the 11th changed how america must look at the world. and since that day, our nation has been on a multi-pronged strategy to keep our country safer. we pursued al qaida wherever al qaida tries to hide. seventy-five percent of known al qaida leaders have been brought to justice. the rest of them know we're after them. we've upheld the doctrine that said if you harbor a terrorist, you're equally as guilty as the terrorist. and the t
for a while white house not care, when about an energy platform to create the united states, canada, mexico, brazil, colombia, and it could displace the middle east as largest source of energy on the planet for years. neil: you say that mitt romney has to come up with bigger ideas, not just a critique? his vision. >> i think tonight is an opportunity to say it in front of a broad audience, he has been talking about trade in latin america since early days of campaign, tonight i think that issue will get a lot of coverage, a great opportunity for mitt romney to talk about what he has been talking about from the beginning, big idea about foreign policy and in. neil: let's talk about your state, florida, polls show, governor has a slight lead, depending on the reading, but he is scoring surprisingly well with latinos that is divergent from polls in other states where his ticket is surging but still 65, 35, what do you make of that? >> florida has many hispanic voters who may be registered to one party or the other but vote for the best candidate and have been hurt by this economy and the downtu
decision the united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans will allow no more slaves on any territory. abraham lincoln elected november much later in est. congress came into session and to put forth a critical portion a way they dealt with the territory to have a dividing line beyond the louisiana purchase to the border california. i will get to my main topic. when abraham lincoln and rejected all meaningful compromise. i am going to talk about three different men. you know, his name. abraham lincoln. the other two not so well known. a great kentucky statesmen some would believe henry stewart from your state to have prior to the nomination of the presidency was the most notable republican. now finally where does it start? henry clay. he had been dead already eight years. during the first half henry clay was a major figure in politics. known as the great compromise. 1820 and 1850 clay had a major role to shape a compromise. that does not bring him down in 1860. he comes because abraham lincoln looked to his political mentor he called him my ideal of a s
at the united states because as you have said that has happened too often in the past. that tragedy should occur we have to step in without any margin for error, enough time for preparation to take over the responsibilities for the biggest job in the world, that of running this great country of ours, to take over the awesome responsibility for commanding the nuclear weaponry that this country has. the debate tonight is a debate about a presidential decision that has to be made by you. the stakes could not be higher. >> moderator: senator bentsen question for you and you have two minutes to respond. what bothers people was not so much for qualification, but your split on policy with governor dukakis. he has said that he does not want to clone himself, but you disagree with him on some major issues, a that the in nicaragua conference, did the death penalty, gun-control among others. if you had to step into the presidency, whose agenda would you pursue, yours or his? >> i am delighted to respond to that question. because we agree on so many things and in the best majority of the issues, we agree on
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
ago you told the "desert sun" that it was in our best interest that the united states remain in both iraq and afghanistan. last months you told the veterans that if president obama couldn't outline a clear and concise explanation of why troops remain in afghanistan, then the u.s. should "get the hell out." what prompted such a change in perspective, and if the u.s. pulled out immediately, how do you address concern that the enemy will fill the void? >> let me go back to a little bit more thorough reporting than that. and the article is there. but what i did say is as long as president obama cannot articulate to the american people why we are there and what we are doing, but allowing our troops to flounder because he feels comfortable because he has given a timeline for withdrawal, that troubles me greatly. under this presidential leadership, yes, i am concerned about our troops being deployed in afghanistan, absolutely. but you know what else troubles me about this timeline of president obama's, which is an arbitrary political timeline? he didn't get that from the generals, he got it
of the united states referred to it as act of terror after it occurred. >> the day after the attack. no acts of terror will shake the resolve of the nation. >> carney tried to use the quick mention by the president on september 1112 to suggest the administration is consistent to call it terror. >> we kept saying we don't know. >> the issue was what led to the test. that has been an issue we provided assessments of, based on the information we have gleaned through the intelligence community. preliminary information. >> two days after the president's mention of terror, carney did not say terror. >> it was in response to a video. a film. that we have judged to be reprehensible and disgusting. >> two more days later, fox's chris wallace asked ambassador rice if she believed what carney said. >> chris, absolutely, i believe that. what sparked recent violence was the airing on the internet of a very hateful, offensive video. >> republican senator bob corker just back from an official trip to libya charged today rice was in his words thrown under the bus. >> what the white house has done to save th
. it was a dangerous showdown that gripped the united states 50 years ago. it was october 28, 1962 when the cuban missile crisis threatened to turn the cold war into a hot one. the bbc has gained exclusive access to new information that shows there was the second stage to the crisis. >> the cuban missile crisis did not end on october 28, 1962. cuba was going to become a nuclear power right under the nose of the united states, 90 miles from florida. >> there was a lot of attention for at least another three weeks and until that moment, we were at the highest state of alert short of nuclear war. >> i call upon chairman khrushchev. he has the opportunity to world the world back from the abyss of destruction. >> people around the world. the sigh of relief in october 1962 when soviet president nikita khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear weapons from cuba. but in a total failure of intelligence, the u.s. was blind to the existence of tactical nuclear weapons. meanwhile, negotiations -- castro began to see some cooperation with the soviets. >> castro is very angry at the soviet the trail. it sounds like
dred scott decision, united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast, never, no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territory. most often their was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line, westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this rather lengthy preface i'm going to get to my main topic of why lincoln rejected on meaningful compromise, which dealt with the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going to talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know, those men, abraham lincoln and we was and what he did. the other two are not so well known. so probably a number of your familiar with henry clay, the great kentucky statesman. probably a cucumber
're a president of the united states. in every position that he has ever held in the governor and now as a candidate he's flipped positions on any issue he's ever had to deal with. >> not any. >> wait. come on. >> during the republican debates, his opponents kept saying, wait a minute, when you were governor of massachusetts you were for gay marriage, pro-abortion rights. he says i changed since then. so he changed during the republican time and now he's changing back. >> toto, we're not in kansas anymore. mitt, we're not in the republican primary anymore. we're not running for a faction of the republican party. we're running to be government -- to lead the government of the entire united states. >> so say whatever he wants as long as he gets elected. >> i don't know where the moral high ground is for president obama on this. remember the guy who wasn't going to take money from super pacs? >> absolutely. good point. another one. you've noted too, those are both right and evolution on gay marriage is ridiculous. but that's not a flip. he tried to guantanamo bay. so did bush and mccain.
. that man is standing back here. presidente the unite of the united states. please welcome the next president of united states, mitt romney. [cheers and applause] ♪ [playing "born free"] ♪ >> that is one heck of a virginia welcome. thank you, virginia. [cheers and applause] you, paul. does the music just bring up your day? [applause] then he for the endorsement of the -- we appreciate the endorsement of the nra. [applause] last night was an important night for the country. [cheers and applause] they got the chance to cut through all the attacks and counterattacks and all the theatrics associate with the campaign and instead listen to substance. i appreciate the fact athat jim lehrer asked questions about substance. i appreciated that i was able to ask obama about obamacare. i asked, why is it that the middle class is still buried in this country? why we have millions of people out of work? why is it that half of our children coming out of college cannot find a job? why is it that when he took office, 32 million people are on food stamps? i asked him those questions. you heard hi
need to focus on getting our society back together and being the united states of america. people fear to mess with us. it seems to me we are getting weaker and weaker. our military. i am for the republicans and i am for mr. romney. that is what i have to say. >> they give for the call. two 19th century presidents graduated from the college in kentucky. this is the second time the college has hosted a vice presidential debate. the first was in 2000. back again for tonight's first and only vice-presidential debate. available on our web site, c- span.org. following the debate, the media's room providing his own spin on the vice-president's performance. caller: a clash between fact and conviction. i heard the congressman say at the end of his speech they will follow through. [indiscernible] we did not get an answer on the tax plan. the one thing he ran away from, the $2 billion comment that govern the romney made, the defense spending. he could not explain their medicare plan. he tried to run away from the fact on senior citizens over time. he criticized the stimulus plan, the recovery ac
both of yours opinions on the following. how are the strategic interests of the united states of america protected by the next administration comes into office and labels the people's republic of china a currency manipulator? >> why don't you start with that because i think that is directed first to you and i could pile on. >> and i left out ladies first but it ain't working. okay. >> president obama has not proposed calling china a currency manipulator. so i leave that to you. >> is that -- >> no. i will also follow-up. >> waiting to pile on. okay, that's fine. that's fine. >> [inaudible]. >> sorry? >> they said governor romney said on the first debate. >> look, i don't have an issue with it. first of all what governor romney essentially is talking about, this is just to clarify, and i'm not going to evade your question, he's saying if china wants to trade we need a level playing field. there isn't a level playing field. t ultimately it is bad for everybody because at some point americans will stop investing in china. and he says he is going to lay on tariffs. so he is saying
energy capital of, of the united states. and that's why i think we need to do everything we can to bolster tourism because it's still the backbone of our economy. when it comes to issues that effect the state of nevada, our delegation has worked very, very well together. let me give you an example. yucca mountain. it doesn't matter what party you're in, what side of the aisle. the fact of the matter is that the nevada delegation stood fast when it came to protecting the people of the state of nevada from acquiring nuclear waste from the rest of the country. i think that's one good example. when it comes to other things, i worked very closely and across the aisle with people every day when it comes to our support for israel, when we insure that the iranians don't acquire nuclear weapons, and i think i would work with anybody to make sure that we got our economy back on track, to get our budget under control and we end wasteful spending. >> moderator: okay, thank you. senator heller? heller: rick, thanks for the question. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about something i thin
reinforce investors' faith in anything of the united states but will lead to more sell offs. >>guest: there you go. that is right. four days after we passed the budget control act of 2011 we had a downgrade by moody's and s&p, now we are talking about being put peoplely on the negative watch. what will happen with investors that do not want to put their money in? worse than that, what if they think their taxes will go from 15 percent to 25 percent? you can see a huge sell off in the stock market. that would create a lost -- a lot of uncertainty. 14 out of 17 economists say this is more critical than the european debt crisis. this should be talked about on every single news broadcast tonight but it won't be because they are talking about big bird. it is ridiculous. >>neil: you are right it is a big development. we are on it. thank you very much. >> we are not forgetting this. we are headed out there, washington, for that wipe out, to avoid it as the fiscal wave crashes down on all of us. that is indeed the fiscal wave. that is you, the taxpayer. we will see how you do. you think you a
the united states and brought a higher tariff on the ones were trying to give the jobs back here. the person to answer that question, romney a roundabout answer bid but the main question is congress runs the whole show. they need to cut up the portis and newsom and work for the american people -- they need to cut out the partisanism and work for the american people. next is cottage grove, wisconsin, joseph who is an independent. >> i just wanted to say that there is a scottish his stories and -- scottish history and who said that democracy comes when people realize that they can vote for themselves the largest gifts from the coffers and i think tonight's debate proved that. >> back to facebook. next call is from roslyn, n.c., a republican. >> i just wanted to say that i think the debate went well. i think the moderator in this debate did better than the last presidential debate, keeping order and what not. i think president obama keeps trying to play the blame game, blaming what he inherited instead of going off of his record, which there really is not much of one cured his record has failed
in the united states, that while the other countries are exploring aggressively, how to increase their production, we have just rolled out a new 5 year plan for offshore thrilling that shuts off east coast, delays alaska until 2017, and has least number of leases in it of any program in the history since they passed legislation to get this thing going. anat the same time the deputy is increasing royalty rates and looking at way its decrease lease terms and making it less appealing for companies to come in to to exploration and production here in the united states. neil: we're showing a lot of land that the administration has say you can't drill othere is a lot. argument goes if we were to tap oil from even half of the off limit lands, we would have enough oil to tell the middle east where to get off, is that true? >> absolutely true, consumer energy alliance, released a report a couple weeks ago that shows we could develop if we could bind field bring feels ont yourself to energy efficiency, meaning we would only need 20 to 20% from overseas, and north american energy reserves ar
starts now. >> immoral, illegal and making the united states hate it around the world. a group of american activists are spreading that around in pakistan. live from islamabad. >>> a new government report shows two companies that employ thousands of americans may actually pose a security concern for the united states. >>> nascar drivers are questioning their safety after a 20 car pile-up at one of nascar's most famous tracks. why one driver calls it bloodthirsty. >>> the obama campaign launching a counteroffensive to a speech th hasn't happened yet. >> reckless. immaturish. that's what news media and fellow republicans called mitt romney's gaffe-filled july tour of england, israel and poland. >> that's what you call a prebuttal. prebuttal. "newsroom" starts now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. happy monday. i'm carol costello. that's where we begin on the campaign trail. president obama is raising cash. mitt romney is raising concerns. this morning he's ripping the administration's handling of the middle east and its many recent flash points like
. but the relationship with the united states, our strategic relationship and technological relationship with the united states is indispensable to us. so, of course, it is necessary for us to be able to continue in both those directions simultaneously. and that's a very important consideration. any such merger of this kind. >> and joining us for more is the director at chatham hasram. they came out against the deal. so that was from a shareholder's point of view. what about from a uk defense point of view? are there political risks in allowing this to go ahead? >> the biggest political risk was referenced somewhat by the foreign secretary there in your clip. if there are large stake holdings as part of the agreement between the french and german governments, anything over 9%, it's going to look very difficult to justify the very special sharing technology relationship that the bae systems has in that market. if b.a. systems loses some of its privileged access, from a shareholder perspective that's bad news. so really they cannot afford to let that political deal muck up the u.s. market. the civilian be
plants and train new workers and create new jobs in the united states of america. that is what we're looking for. we can help big factories and small businesses double their exports and create 1 million new manufacturing jobs over the next four years. you can make that happen. let me tell you how i will create 12 million new jobs. my energy independence policy means 3 million new jobs. my tax reform plan to lower rates for the middle class and small business creates 7 million more. expanding trade, cracking down on china, and improving job training takes us to over 12 million new jobs. i'm mitt romney, and i approve this message. that is the candidates and their plan for creating jobs, particularly in manufacturing. eric morath is an economy reporter for "the wall street journal." chris savage is back of the table -- nice to see you, mr. savage. how much leverage does the president have in creating jobs in the manufacturing sector? guest: it is difficult for them to directly see these numbers go up and down. we have seen the obama administration tried to do that the last four year
terrorist has been fighting extradition to the united states. last week he lost that battle and today he was in court right here in new york for the very first time. just ahead, how he pleaded and why security insisted on taking away his prosthetic hand. that's coming up from the journalist on this tuesday foxce report make 70,000 trades a sec. ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. and i was told to call my next of kin. at 33 years old, i was having a heart attack. now i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i didn't know this could happen so young. take control, talk to your doctor. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s d dot our "i"s, we sll run into oblems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forg
call myself an escapee from the united states congress. i'm now at a place that is bipartisan and very serious and focused that has civil dialogue and has very little resemblance to my last line of work. but at any rate, while there and while the ranking member of the house intelligence committee, i met numerous times we've rage when he was the director of the mossad. it was a very difficult time for israel and us, and he always provided and still provides wise counsel. one of the things that people may not know about him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the mi
the president of the united states has stood on the right side of history. that kind of credibility is precisely why we have been able to show leadership on a wide range of issues. >> you can watch the entire final debate on foreign policy between president obama and mitt romney today at 12:10 eastern here on c-span. >> this is the downsizing of the charts. you are watching it live. one of 10,000 homes they are trying to get done in the next four years. these are houses that are never coming back. >> one-family every 20 minutes moving out. >> moving out of detroit. >> these houses are disappearing from the landscape. >> just recently, 164 firefighters were laid off as part of the downsizing, effort for mayor bing to get fire -- to get finances under control. detroit must have the highest cases of arson in the country. they were rehired. the money came from the department of homeland security. i cannot want to overstate. that is something you want to think about. the department of homeland security needed to step in to keep detroit as safe as it could be. it could be a lot safer. i have wondered
policy over the course of history in the united states but it's not been applied appropriately. it would be more fair if it was a place on your income level so that the whole purpose of these people could have social mobility but it's not apply to people that come from low-income homes who don't necessarily have the same opportunity that many people have from middle class or upper class homes i think that creates bitterness from many people on that. last i feel like i guess the main issue is affirmative action right now is that it has unintended consequences for instance a lot of universities people of african descent who generally have parents who came here who have higher education degrees, doctors, they are giving preference over african-americans in selection in schools, so that i think is an unintended consequence and if we did it based on the income level would be it. >> host: orlando florida republican line. what is your name? >> caller: its karen. i think what we have to understand when it comes to affirmative action is a remedy. what i mean by a legal remedy to right the wrong i
, the president of the united states asked mayor bloomburg, i would like to take a look at all of the damage and mayor bloomburg had a press conference and said we are flattered by the fact that the president of the united states would like to come and visit us, but not right now and we are really busy and the first responders need to pay to exeem put things back in order. it would be great if the president goes to new jersey and the president will tour the devastation with the chief executive new jersey chris christy. >> gretchen: when the president comes the city is shut down . the city can't have security detail and anything like that at all. but he will go to new jersey which is your home eric. >> i am trying to figure out why. i get it he wants to see the damage. please come can go and sign the check to help fema to sign over the money . chris christie was on saying that we have gotten acess to the funs we are going to need. i am not sure what touring the sight. >> steve: it is smart politics for the president. there is chris christie helping the people on the jersey shore. it is essent
chances do democrats have of retaining control of the united states? >> when you look at the battleground states that you listinged. after of those states are republican held seats. >> can you gain control if president obama wins re-election? >> sure, chuck and here's why, we're win right now in connecticut, we're winning in wisconsin. we got a little separation last week or so. governor romney's strong performance, really the resurgence for the party so we feel like we have a great path to the majority with or without governor romney winning. >> let me start with a virginia. can george allen win without mitt romney carrying the state? >> obviously it would be easier if romney won the state. the problem that tim kaine has is that this is a guy supporting sequestration, which is devastating the state of virginia. supports the president's tax plan which is devastating to him in northern virginia. >> shelly berkeley in nevada, is there any chance that she wins a senate seat? >> three months ago democratings only had a 30,000 voter registrati registration increasing the number of democrats. >
of the united states out there looking over his shoulder wondering whether his vice- president is going to be supporting him. mrs. ferraro has quite a few differences with vice president mondale, and i understood it when she changed her position on tax credits and buses and to extend the grain embargo. he now says he was against it. if they win, and i hope they don't, but if they win, she will have to accommodate some views, but she will give him the same kind of loyalty i am giving president reagan. we're not far apart on anything. second, i can walk into the oval office any time and he might agree or might not. but he also knows i will be talking about it to the press or knifing him in the back by leaking to make me look good and complicate the problems of the president of united states. >> congresswoman ferraro, your opponent has served in the house of representatives, been ambassador to the united nations, ambassador to china, director of the central intelligence agency and has been vice president for four years. how is your three terms in the house of representatives stacked up aga
in a country where the united states is engaged right now in one of their biggest drone campaigns. authorities are now saying in yemen a gunman assassinate add security official who worked for the u.s. embassy in yemen's capital city. place during a motorcycle drive by. the pentagon confirmed that they sent in a team of 50 marines to bolster security in the middle east amid the protests against the film. a yemen officials tells fox that the killing today was likely a targeted hit from al qaeda and the arabian peninsula. but it is too early to confirm a direct link. the pentagon called the al qaeda branch there "the most dangerous offshoot of the terror group anywhere." so far this year, the united states has conducted more than 30 separate drone strikes inside the borders of yemen, a jump if ten last year. jonathan hunt is live in new york studios. what is the united states saying? >>jonathan: officials are deeply saddened by the murder of the man what worked for the embassy in yemen for something like 11 years. they also say that they condemn what they call this "vicious" murder in the strong
is it's unl changing is that he wants to be president of the united states of america. >> when the criticism of this guy, when you say he's rude i don't understand that. >> really? >> he didn't cuss, talk about their mother, that's what people do when they're having a conversation, whether it's somebody on the right or the left. mitt romney was very aggressive in the presidential debate and some pooirm were saying that they were bordering on rude. but guess what? he won the debate. you may think joe biden is rude but that's part of it when you're in a debate. >> you drew a corollary to how people are in life. that's not necessarily a net positive. but i'll say this. to the -- "meet the press" joe biden did dominate but he motivated both bases. the left and the right. the question is, how are the mannerisms and how that rudeness might play off of independence. and i'll say one more thing we might be confused about the word "authentic." i believe should he walk up right here right now i'll see the guy i saw in the debate but that doesn't mean unimpeachable. authentic and truthful
prm us knghe do the road will fought reinforce investors' faith in anything of the united states but will lead to more sell offs. >>guest: there you go. that is right. butr af1 we pdhe d doad moody's and s&p, now we are talking about being put peoplely on the negative watch. what will happen with investors that do not want to put their money in? ththes wo mat wat ifey er t percent? you can see a huge sell off in the stock market. that would create a lost -- a lot of uncertainty. 14 out of 17 economists say this is morerih t european debt crisis. this should be talked about on every single news broadcast tonight but it won't be because they are talking about big bird. it is ridiculous. >>neil: you are right it is a dop. reit anu uc. >> we are not forgetting this. we are headed out there, washinon, for that wipe out, to avoid it as the fiscal wave crashes wn on a of us. that isindeed the fcal w. iou tye w eou do. you think you are okay. ing is okay. looking go. oops, this is so important, we will be live in washington,c, onur kngff10cost oed m. eer o talking about this. everyone is
. this country better wake up. i appreciate you taking my call and i love the united states of america, but we need better leadership. we need good people to pray for god to lead us in the right direction. host: we have plano, texas with brian, a democrat. caller: good morning. as far as the vice-presidential selection, i have been known to vote republican in the past. as soon as they chose paul ryan, i said, there's no way. far too radical. i don't think a lot of people stop and think. their parents are part of this election. if you elect someone into the white house and give them control of congress, to be able to turn medicare into a voucher program, the effect that it's going to have downrange is horrible. i want to make another point. i am so tired of hearing the president had the congress for the first two years of his term. that is 100% incorrect. people need to educate themselves on how congress works. he had 60 votes until august when tent kennedy died. -- ted kennedy. then he had 59. a special election seat was triggered, the election with scott brown, that gave the republicans 41. t
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